I’m reposting this due to the recent incident in Austin where everyone is in an uproar over the arrest of a female jogger.

Unfortunately in this case, the arrest may be proper. If the officer was writing tickets for “jaywalking,” then she was legally “arrested” to be released on a citation (similar to an ROR). As she was technically under arrest, she would have to provide ID information, and if she refused could be charged with Failure to ID.

ExCop-Lawyer

The Texas Failure to Identify law is fairly simple.  Why don’t police get it?  It states:

  • (a)  A person commits an offense if he intentionally refuses to give his name, residence address, or date of birth to a peace officer who has lawfully arrested the person and requested the information.
  • (b)  A person commits an offense if he intentionally gives a false or fictitious name, residence address, or date of birth to a peace officer who has:
    • (1)  lawfully arrested the person;
    • (2)  lawfully detained the person; or
    • (3)  requested the information from a person that the peace officer has good cause to believe is a witness to a criminal offense.
  • (c)  Except as provided by Subsections (d) and (e), an offense under this section is:
    • (1)  a Class C misdemeanor if the offense is committed under Subsection (a); or
    • (2)  a Class B misdemeanor if the offense is committed…

View original post 733 more words

Advertisements